Pole Position video game

Pole Position was the first racing video game to feature a track based on a real racing circuit. It was also the first game to feature a qualifying lap, requiring the player to complete a time trial before they can compete in Grand Prix races.

Once the player has qualified, they must complete the race in the time allowed, avoiding collisions with CPU-controlled opponents and billboards along the sides of the track.

The game's publisher Atari publicized the game for its "unbelievable driving realism" in providing a Formula 1 experience behind a racing wheel. The game's graphics featured full-colour landscapes with scaling sprites, including race cars and other signs, and a pseudo-3D, third-person, rear perspective view of the track, with its vanishing point swaying side to side as the player approaches corners, accurately simulating forward movement into the distance.

See also:

Sim racing

Prior to the division between arcade-style racing and sim racing, the earliest attempts at providing driving simulation experiences were arcade racing video games, dating back to Pole Position, a 1982 arcade game developed by Namco, which the game's publisher Atari publicized for its "unbelievable driving realism" in providing a Formula 1 experience behind a racing wheel at the time.

It featured other AI cars to race against, crashes caused by collisions with other vehicles and roadside signs, and introduced a qualifying lap concept where the player needs to complete a time trial before they can compete in Grand Prix races.

It also pioneered the third-person rear-view perspective used in most racing games since then, with the track's vanishing point swaying side to side as the player approaches corners, accurately simulating forward movement into the distance.

For manufacture and distribution in the United States, Namco approached Bally Midway with a choice of two games in 1982. Bally Midway chose Mappy while Atari was left to publish Pole Position, which turned out to be the most popular game of 1983.

See also:

Indy 500 1977 video game

Indy 500 is a 1977 racing video game developed by Atari, Inc. for its Video Computer System (later known as the Atari 2600). It is themed around the Indianapolis 500, and is based on Atari's earlier 8-player arcade game, Indy 800.

The game ran on the Namco Pole Position hardware, which was the first to use 16-bit microprocessors, with two Zilog Z8002 processors. It was also capable of displaying up to 3840 colors.

The game was an early example of product placement within a video game, with billboards around the track advertising actual companies. However, some billboards were specific to the two versions such as those of Pepsi and Canon in the Namco version, and those of 7-Eleven, Dentyne, Centipede, and Dig Dug in the Atari version, which replaced such billboards as those of Marlboro and Martini & Rossi, who although were prominent motorsport sponsors at the time, would be found inappropriate in the American market for a game aimed towards children.

Other billboards appeared in both versions.

See also:

Nissan Note

Japan model went on sale in 2013-12-25. Early Nissan Note models include S, X, X Aero Style, X Emergency Brake Package, X Aero Style Emergency Brake Package, S DIG-S, X DIG-S, X DIG-S Aero Style, X DIG-S Emergency Brake Package, X DIG-S Aero Style Emergency Brake Package, MEDALIST, MEDALIST Emergency Brake Package, X FOUR, X FOUR Aero Style, X FOUR Emergency Brake Package, X FOUR Aero Style Emergency Brake Package.

Early Autech Note and Note Enchante models include X, X Emergency Brake Package, X DIG-S, X DIG-S Emergency Brake Package, X FOUR, X FOUR Emergency Brake Package. Early Note Driver Seat Mighty Grip models include X DIG-S.

The game was also featured in a TV commercial shown only on MTV (originally called Music Television). It was part of a series of TV spots that Atari created in the 1980s exclusively for MTV.

(Source: Wikipedia)